Services for February 2019

theme: Embodying

Unless otherwise noted, services include sermons preached by Rev. Andrew Clive Millard and take place at 9:30am and 11:15am on Sundays.

Mission in Motion: "What the UUFP Mission Means to Me"
2/24/2019 0 Comments

Grow in Wonder, Connect in Love,​ ​​Engage in Service, Inspire Generosity
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This mission of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula is manifested in many ways! We celebrate these positive experiences and thank those of you who are willing to share your story!
By Alicia Hofler
​This reflection was read aloud by its author from UUFP’s pulpit on Sunday, February 3, 2019.
I am Alicia Hofler, and I currently serve on the UUFP Policy Board as Vice President of the Fellowship​. I started attending the church in the mid-1990’s and became a member in 2002.

​As several members have done in recent weeks, I am here today to talk about my relationship with our church’s mission statement.
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The mission of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula is:
"Grow in Wonder. Connect in Love. Engage in Service. Inspire Generosity."

While our mission is an expression of how we at the UUFP see ourselves and want to be in the world, to me, it is also shorthand for being a good human being. It reminds us that we as people, co-inhabitants of the planet, are good and wonderful. It also implies that we have the capacity to stretch and expand, that we have the potential to be more, that we are not fixed in time. In a good way, though. Not in the admonishing way that a disappointed adult may say to a child that he/she/they “can do better than that” after having fallen short on some expectation or having met the letter of a request but not the intent. It does not imply somehow that we are holding back. It says instead that because we have inside us these gifts of curiosity, compassion, motivation, and caring that we have resources we can draw on to be more present and active in making positive change in ourselves and our communities.

Our mission reminds us that we are curious and want to learn. When we feed our curiosities and learn, we grow in wonder at the world around us, humanity’s capacity for good, the beauty of nature and the stars above. Growing in wonder opens us up to possibilities that we may have not considered previously.

Compassion gives us the ability to pause and consider the other in an interaction. Pausing lets us put “us” aside and leads to empathy, so in challenging situations, we can connect in love instead of confusion or frustration, emotions which would make it difficult or impossible for us to listen fully. Connecting in love allows us to bridge gaps in understanding and perspective while maintaining respect for different viewpoints and assumptions. This is when real connection with another individual happens.
Being motivated means we are eager, excited, and driven to act. Gathering together allows us to channel that motivation to address injustice and engage in service. Engaging in service is how we work for change in the world.

Caring directs our activities and keeps us engaged. It drives us to share our gifts and talents with the wider world. Inspiring generosity is how through our actions and deep sense of commitment that we awaken the potential in others to act.

I value and support the UUFP because it is a place that believes in itself and its congregants’ potential. Our mission embodies those beliefs, and by capturing our innate gifts and how we use them, it empowers us to continue to reach out for new experiences and become ever better human beings.

Thank you for listening.
Interested in sharing how the mission of UUFP is alive and moving throughout the Fellowship and beyond?
Contact eflame@uufp.org with content or questions. ​

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“Dinner & Dance the Night Away!” to Benefit LINK
2/22/2019 0 Comments

By Mason Moseley
The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula (UUFP) has supported the Living Interfaith Network of Hampton Roads (LINK) from very early in its existence. We continue to do so by sharing the Sunday morning offertory monthly; helping out with PORT (People Offering Resources Together), the winter homeless shelter; and with donations of clothes and foodstuff.

​Now we have another opportunity to help and have fun – at “Dinner & Dance the Night Away” on Saturday, April 6, from 6:30 to 11:00 p.m. Our very own Rocket Men, including Jeff Hinkley and Robin van Tine, will perform.
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Tickets and details are available at: Dinner & Dance the Night Away!

​Your participation supports this collaborative mission of providing practical solutions for the homeless and other community families struggling to survive!

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February RE News: "What are our next steps for our garden?"
2/20/2019 0 Comments

By Joanne Dingus,
Director of Religious Education
dre@uufp.org
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I want to thank everyone for their positive feedback to my recent sermon, “The Garden Grows the Community.” I’ve received some of the “Seeds for Thought” sheets back and would love to receive more. Just drop them off in my office or on Sunday mornings. It feels like a lot of people are interested in the idea of creating a community garden, but we need a plan in order to move forward.

​In meeting with the Religious Education (RE) Committee, they suggested starting by meeting with our Master Gardeners and other garden enthusiasts to gather information about plants and planting for our area. If you are a Master Gardener or have a green thumb, would you please contact me so that we can set up a meeting? The second suggestion was to put out a call for gardening materials, especially if we want to make some raised beds. We want to be as green as possible, re-using and repurposing materials. I could use a couple of people willing to post these requests for materials on local social networks. So if you would like to help in this way, please let me know.

Finally, I would like to get a sense from everyone in the congregation where their interests lie in helping with this project. Are you interested in planting? In maintaining, weeding, watering? Do you want to create lesson plans to teach in the garden? Would you like to be part of a mentoring team? Do you want to help build a vegetable stand? Make garden art? Create an irrigation system? Do you want to hand out flyers to neighbors letting them know how they can work with us? Do you want to lead a cooking class using the produce we grow? Do you want to research justice issues that could connect with our garden?

I think the opportunities to connect and grow with this garden are endless. So, I really want to hear from you about what things you would like to help with, support in some way, or lead. We will need plenty of “Queen bees” and “Worker bees." In addition, I would like to meet with people who are excited about getting involved with the community garden on March 3, 2019, after second service. Please come ready to share your seeds for thought with us!

See you in the RE!

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Mission in Motion: "What the UUFP Mission Means to Me"
2/20/2019 0 Comments

​Grow in Wonder, Connect in Love,​ ​​Engage in Service, Inspire Generosity
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This mission of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula is manifested in many ways! We celebrate these positive experiences and thank those of you who are willing to share your story!
By Brittany Welch Robertson
​This reflection was read aloud by its author from UUFP’s pulpit on Sunday, February 3, 2019.
Good morning! My name is Brittany Welch Robertson, and I have been a member here for the last six years. I am currently a co-chair of the Leadership Development Committee, a member of the Religious Education (RE) committee, and involved in both committees for our previous intern ministers, Rev. Chris Hockman and Rev. Walter Clark.
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​I did not grow up as a Unitarian Universalist. My first experience with a UU church was seeing it as the building next door to the funeral home in my hometown, which was also located across from a beautifully built multi-million-dollar mansion complete with heated lawn so the guard dogs feet would not be cold. At that time, I was too young then to take myself there, but after college and upon moving here to Newport News, my husband, Jesse, mentioned going to a UU church, since he was dissatisfied with his experience at his local Presbyterian one, and I could not find another Catholic church like the one I had come from. We looked it up, and UUFP was right down the road. I remember attending a Valentine’s Day themed sermon that Rev. Andrew Millard was giving, and we just kept coming back.

Part of the reason was for the people. Newport News is a sprawling city to move to and not know anyone here. I know at first I felt completely alone. I found a community here, and I love it! Everyone genuinely cares about one another, and if one member becomes sick or has a hardship in their family, everyone rallies together to offer up anything they can and cook meals for them. I know if I don’t come for a few weeks in a row, someone always makes me smile when I come back in the door. It might be Judy from behind the podium, or Henry standing by the name badges waiting to give out a bear hug, or maybe a Good Morning from Carey, who’s manning the table out front for our various social justice causes. I feel wanted. I even see these people outside of “church time." Let’s be honest; how many people here shop at Costco or Trader Joe's? We’ve probably seen each other and have waved hi or exchanged a few words and a greeting. I’ve had dinner at the Sheeler’s, gone clothes shopping with Sarah, and just yesterday was painting at Joanne’s house. We are all Connected to one another in Love.

I also come back because of the sermons. I like how I am encouraged to think here and ponder the greater state of the universe instead of being told it is exactly like this or that. Social justice issues and examining morals are frequent topics in sermons that make me examine myself and how I perceive others and their choices. They are very thought provoking. I am not forced to believe in anything or have scripture interpreted for me. I can come to my own conclusions and listen to others on their journey to figure it out too as we discuss things over coffee time. I attended the Articulating your UU Faith program that our prior intern minister Walter held a few years ago so that I could try to put my own personal beliefs into words and how to describe what it means to be a UU. I am still trying to figure this all out, but I am a lot closer to voicing it than I was in the past. This rich discussion and self-reflection is a key to growing as a person…one might say Grow in Wonder.

Engage in Service and Inspire Generosity. These parts of the mission statement I am still working on. It’s the part that I am not fulfilling as much as the other two areas I mentioned earlier. I help out on my Hospitality team, and I teach RE on occasion, but could I help out more and offer my services in other ways for the community? I participate in the yearly canvas with my husband, but is there another way I can be generous besides with just my money? How do you balance the responsibility to your daily life and what you would like to accomplish here at the same time? These are still questions I am pondering. I love coming here and love what we stand for, which begs me to ask how can I challenge myself to continue on living our mission statement to fullest extent?

And what about you? Have you asked yourself these questions lately? What does the UUFP and our mission statement mean to you? Why do you keep coming back?
Interested in sharing how the mission of UUFP is alive and moving throughout the Fellowship and beyond?
Contact eflame@uufp.org with content or questions.

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A Day for All People
2/7/2019 0 Comments

Rev. Andrew lighting the UUFP's chalice
“For all that is our life” by Rev. Andrew

​January is a busy month in Richmond, thanks to the legislative session of the Virginia General Assembly. I spent three days there last month with different organizations: January 9th with Equality Virginia; January 30th with the Virginia Conservation Network; and January 22nd with the Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy, a non-partisan coalition of more than seven hundred faith communities working for a more just society, when I was joined by UUFP members Alice and Bob Smith, Lucy and Robin van Tine, Mason Moseley, Sandra Engelhardt and Sarah Davis.
Together, we spent the day: learning about VICPP’s legislative priorities — Driver’s Privilege Cards and In-State Tuition, Wage Theft and Wage Justice, Environmental Justice, and Opposing Weapons in Worship; meeting with our representatives — or, more often, their legislative aides; talking with one another over lunch about regional concerns and efforts; and attending one of a number of afternoon workshops. The day concluded with an address by the Lieutenant Governor and a closing litany, written by Vice Chair of VICPP’s Board, Rev. Dr. Faith Harris, which included the following lines:
Day for All People participants
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We have spent the day advocating for environmental justice, protections for the immigrant among us as well as for a living wage and dignity for all Virginians.
Our good works are not yet finished, but will continue as we return to our various homes, houses of worship and campuses where we will write letters and make phone calls to our legislators. We will encourage others to be advocates and activists for all people.

As part of bringing the day home to “encourage others to be advocates and activists for all people”, I invited our UUFP participants to write about something that made an impression on them and something that impacts our Fellowship as a faith community. I am pleased to share some of their responses here.

​Sarah begins, “What made the biggest impression on me was the immense time, volunteer hours and energy that went in to organizing the lobbying day! I was further impressed by the great zeal of people from all over Virginia who came to participate! Honestly, political activism is exhausting and takes tireless, persistent, consistent effort by vast numbers of people! It was encouraging to see it all in action.”
Day for All People participants
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As Mason notes, “With the federal government closed and legislative and executive branches at loggerheads, I was impressed with the activity at the Virginia General Assembly. Cramped hallways full of citizen and professional lobbyists. People turning out from all over the state to be there. Our being made more aware of the issues that mostly we’d read about in local media.”

Sandra comments, “This was my fifth lobby day and the best one yet. I finally got to meet Delegate Yancey of the 94th District. He met with seven of us from the UUFP and had comments on our concerns. My issue was the guns in churches and he agreed that this was not a good idea. We met with Senator Mason and he was very supportive of our issues, saying the governor might have to veto [the bill repealing the statutory prohibition on carrying dangerous weapons to a place of worship]. The VICPP had made the appointments for all who registered and that was wonderful.”

I was impressed by the combination of professionalism and warmth in the legislative aides with whom I met. Whether aligned or in opposition on the various issues, these individuals spend all day talking with constituents while maintaining a consistently respectful and considerate attitude. It cannot be easy talking with so many people, some of whom will be upset or even angry, but the legislative aides are always welcoming and willing to listen.

Concerning our Fellowship as a faith community living its values in the world, I realized anew how someone contacting a legislator on an issue that affects them directly can have a significant impact. In the office of Delegate Pogge’s legislative aide, a chart showing various bills she was tracking included an effort to allow ice-cream trucks to have flashing lights, and the aide explained that this was because an ice-cream truck owner had contacted Pogge about what he saw as an issue of safety. When talking with legislators, our advocacy for issues will be more effective if we can make them as personal as possible.

Sandra continues, “The workshop that I attended was regarding the minimum wage. There are organizations in Richmond and Alexandria that give publicity to those companies that provide a ‘living wage’. There are three levels of support in Richmond ranging from $9.50 an hour with health insurance to $16.00 an hour, and there is an effort underway in Williamsburg to create a similar group. The Peninsula might be included.”

Sarah observes, “One thing that impacts the UUFP as a faith community is that there were scores of UUs at the Day For All People along with Muslims, all stripes of Christians, Jews, Hindus and others. I think we saw so many UUs at the event because Unitarian Universalist Principles require participation in our government in order to fulfill their promise. I’ve come to realize that political activism is fundamental to being a UU. Our congregation is enriched by the fact that many at the UUFP take this fact to heart!”

Mason adds, “The Fellowship is gaining legislative advocacy strength. Several members have been doing this type of activity over several sessions, and several had their introductory experience this year. The task is to keep this up when the General Assembly is not in session. About three thousand bills are dealt with in the forty-five day session. More one-on-one conversations between sessions may be the more influential situation on issues important to us.”
Day for All People participants
Picture by VICPP
Please consider joining us and the Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy in these efforts during the rest of this year and into 2020’s legislative session. Every voice is important and needed in the practice of democracy, and participation is not as difficult or as daunting as it might seem.

As Lucy reflects, “I was a little nervous as we entered the sanctuary of the large, old, slightly crumbling Protestant church in downtown Richmond. It was quickly filling up with people like me, church people of all faiths from all around the state, who had come to lobby that day on behalf of progressive legislation for the state of Virginia. I didn’t really feel prepared. I was inwardly berating myself for not having gone over the white papers on the VICPP website. And furthermore, in my haste to leave the house that morning, I had rushed out without my reading glasses. The organizers at the church had handed me a sheaf of papers outlining the legislation we were going to urge our senators and delegates to support later that morning, but as I took my seat and glanced them over, the words were hardly legible — they were fuzzy on the page.

“Then the first speaker climbed the stairs to the dais and took his place behind the pulpit. He was a middle-aged man with dark hair and he spoke with an accent. As I scribbled some notes, he gave us practical reasons why he and so many others should have a provisional driver’s license. The bottom line was that, like everyone else, he, and others like him, needed to get to work in a safe and legal manner. He did not smile as he spoke. His eyes were sad as he looked out at us. After he gave his short talk, he stopped reading his notes and looked out at us. ‘The most important thing to remember when you talk to your senator and delegate today is to speak from your heart. Thank you.’ Later that morning just a few of us were in the plush, blue-carpeted office of my delegate’s legislative aide. No longer bolstered by the throng of church folk, I thought of the man who had stood before us. My fellow Virginian. My brother. I spoke without hesitation or fear.”

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“Spirit of Life” Workshop 2/20/19 - “Sing in My Heart”
2/7/2019 0 Comments

Sponsored by the UUFP Membership Committee
SAVE the DATE!

Scott Kasmire will facilitate the second "Spirit of Life" workshop on February 20, 2019, from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m., in the UUFP Sanctuary. As part of our Beloved Community Wednesdays, a potluck supper begins at 6:30 p.m., followed by this workshop and other programs.
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Scott is a member of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula. He has been a UU since the mid-1990's and a K-12 educator since the early 2000's. His hobbies are philosophy, theology, Star Trek, and caffeine – not necessarily in that order.​ Scott will lead us in discussing the "Spirit of Life" song's second phrase, "Sing in my heart."
​All workshops are “stand alone” so we hope you will join us for one, several or for the remaining eight (of nine) sessions.

We warmly invite you to share this time with us to grow, connect, engage and to inspire one another.
Visit
Beloved Community Wednesdays
​for complete workshop and other program information.
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Click to enlarge.

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Canvass Kick-off!
2/4/2019 0 Comments

By Steve Farthing, UUFP Canvass Chair, 2019 - 2020
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Dearest Members and Friends of the UUFP,
I am pleased to announce that our annual pledge drive, the Canvass, begins this week! During this event, we pledge to financially support the Fellowship from July 2019 to June 2020, our fiscal year.
Your pledge this year, and your faithful support in past years, have been essential to our success. It has made full-time ministry and professional religious education a reality. It has supported our acquisition of the Office Building and its property. It has provided a foundation for the UUFP that undergirds all of our efforts. Thank you for making the UUFP a vibrant, thriving community.

This year we are tackling two new initiatives: fully funding the position of Director of Religious Education (expanding Joanne Dingus’s position to full-time and increasing her responsibilities to more comprehensively provide religious education) and covering all our expenses via the pledge drive (eliminating past reliance on labor-intensive fundraisers). We have set a bold goal of $215,000 in pledges.

You will receive a letter and pledge card in the mail over the next few days. Please read the letter, fill in and sign the pledge card, and return it over the next three weeks. Pledge cards may be returned to the Fellowship and placed in the pledge box (a clearly-marked box will be on a table behind the entryway podium starting next week), mailed to the UUFP, placed in the offering basket, or returned to the office. The Finance Committee will track all pledges and provide weekly progress updates.

Pledge cards are due by February 24, 2019. Please return them early if you can!

If you have questions, members of the Canvass team will attend all services over the next few weeks and may be contacted via email or phone. Pat Yaros and I (canvass@uufp.org.com) are primary contacts; David Walsh and Judy Remsberg are also available (please check the latest version of the UUFP Directory).

Canvass activities are not limited to service. Expect to see additional information in emails, on Facebook, and in The eFlame. On March 24, we will mark the conclusion of the Canvass with a celebratory meal, a Chili Cook-off with bread, desserts, and beverages. Don’t miss the fun!
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Mission in Motion: "What the UUFP Mission Means to Me"
2/4/2019 0 Comments

Grow in Wonder, Connect in Love,​ ​​Engage in Service, Inspire Generosity.
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This mission of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of the Peninsula is manifested in many ways! We celebrate these positive experiences and thank those of you who are willing to share your story!
By Kadri Ozyurt
​This reflection was read aloud by its author from UUFP’s pulpit on Sunday, February 3, 2019.
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Hello. I am Kadri Ozyurt. I am a Policy Board member and the Treasurer of this congregation. I have been a member of the UUFP since March 2017. Before that, I had been a Friend of Unitarian Universalism for about 35 years, through my wife Kathryn.
​“Grow in Wonder, Connect in Love, Engage in Service, Inspire Generosity.”

This four-line mission is a very good reflection of what the UUFP is, and what it stands for. This mission also resonates with me. The way I see it, the UUFP, as a spiritual home, provides these four pillars as values and fills every cubic inch of this sanctuary. This, in turn, enables the people, who come through these doors, to grow in wonder, connect in love, engage in service, and inspire generosity. From this, an ever-growing, two-way relationship stems, from which both sides benefit.

Grow in Wonder:

Who would have thought that a Muslim guy like me would grow to be on the UUFP Policy Board, and further, the Treasurer of this institution, which grew out of its Judeo-Christian roots? And yet, to my wonder, I have succeeded at this highest level personal achievement of my life, thanks to the accepting and nurturing congregation. This is a good example of the UUFP growing its people in wonder.

Connect in Love:

When Andrew asked me to give a testimonial, I was relunctant because of the fact that I had stage fright. I am here this morning because a member and a friend in this congragetion told me: “Kadri, you square yourself; own this testimonial. You know Kadri; speak Kadri.” This was a powerful encouragement, which catapulted me to this pulpit, and a great example of connecting in love.

Engage in Service:

The UUFP creates opportunities to engage in service in many ways. I participated in PORT (People Offering Resources Together) and helped those who needed food and shelter. Recently, I participated in the Women’s March event. On a personal level, I distribute “Meals on Wheels” for the Peninsula Center for Aging. Also, my wife and I participated in building homes for Habitat for Humanity.

Inspire Generosity:

I support the UUFP with my resources to help further the community outreach, social justice, environment, and other initiatives that aim to better human lives. I am amazed with the level of willingness to help a fellow UU, when in need. I was putting a pergola in the backyard, a honey-do list item. I didn’t have the experience and knowledge for how to lay a concrete base, so I asked for help. Four of my UU friends came to help; one did despite he was under the weather, and one still has stuck with me so far.

In conclusion, the mission of the UUFP, Grow in Wonder, Connect in Love, Engage in Service, and Inspire Generosity, will continue to shape the culture of this congregation, in particular, and the world, in general, and I will continue to grow with it.

Thank you.
Interested in sharing how the mission of UUFP is alive and moving throughout the Fellowship and beyond?
Contact eflame@uufp.org with content or questions.

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February Birthdays - 2019
2/1/2019 0 Comments

Happy Birthday to all our members born in February!
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Nan Procyson
Cher Balsley
Barry Campbell
Jeanne Labuda
Milyn King
Megan Zunk-Wasilausky
Peggy Tomko
Barbara Linde
Rosalee Pfister
Nicholas Hagstrom
Steve King
Arik Rhone-Christensen
If you are a member and have a birthday in February that we overlooked, please contact Bobbie Schilling at membership@uufp.org.

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Services for February 2019
2/1/2019 0 Comments

Rev. Andrew at the UUFP Pulpit
theme: Embodying

Unless otherwise noted, services include sermons preached by Rev. Andrew Clive Millard and take place at 9:30am and 11:15am on Sundays.

February 3rd: “Spiritual Beings Having a Human Experience”

We experience the world around us — including each other — through our senses, interacting with the tangible universe by means of our bodies. We are not isolated minds of pure reason nor spirits of lofty virtue, but rather we are integral to the physical world, immersed in it, enjoying it, suffering with it, witnessing to it and helping to transform it thanks to our embodiment.

February 10th: “The Garden Grows the Community”

For two decades, religious education programs have been noticing what some are calling the “Death of Sunday School”. The Sunday school model of religious education that worked so successfully a half century ago may not be what present-day families need. Many programs are looking for alternative ways to support faith formation through family ministry.

Joanne Dingus is in her nineteenth year as Director of Religious Education at the Fellowship. Raised as a Unitarian Universalist from the age of twelve, she brings her UU faith to all aspects of her life. Joanne is a very proud and happy mother of two amazing young adults and is looking forward to their graduation ceremonies this May.

February 17th: “Bridges, Not Walls”

There has been a lot of talk about walls of late, when it is clear that what we need are bridges. Rather than building walls that serve no purpose except that of an imaginary crisis, we should be repairing the bridges that allow our society to function. Rather than building walls around our hearts, we should be reaching out to one another with kind words and helpful hands.

February 24th: “Embodying the Interconnected Web”

Let’s celebrate our place in the interdependent web of all existence with the help of the four elements: air, water, earth and fire. Let’s give thanks for the simple gifts that sustain our daily lives: the air we breathe, the water we drink, the foods we eat, and the light of the Sun that makes them all possible. Let’s sing and share in community with one another and the Earth together!

Special music will be provided by the UUFP’s ChorUUs!

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